Motoring

Who needs Holden or HSV? The fire-breathing 450kW Chevrolet Corvette Z06 has been trademarked for Australia by GMSV! – Car News

Holden and HSV might have closed up shop in Australia, but that doesn’t mean we’re destined to miss out on some of General Motors’ coolest cars, with the fire-breathing Chevrolet Corvette Z06 quietly trademarked for Australia by GMSV.

GMSV, you’ll recall, is the phoenix that rose from the ashes of Holden and HSV, with the GM-backed performance sub-brand responsible for the Chevrolet Silverado, and the soon-to-launch C8 Corvette.

But a quiet trademark application, lodged with the relevant government agency on earlier this week, suggests the fun won’t stop there, clearing the path for the Z06 nameplate to launch in Australia.

Read more about the Chevrolet Corvette

The Z06 will be the first of several hi-po Corvette variants, with US media reporting the track-focused performance variant will pack the most powerful naturally aspirated V8 engine in the brand’s long history of producing powerful V8 engines.

The 5.5-litre V8 is an off-shoot of the brand’s racing donk, and is tipped to make around 450kW, deliver a 9000rpm redline, and produce a soundtrack that will all-but shatter windows at noise.

That engine its expected to pair with a faster-changing version of the Corvette’s eight-speed Tremec dual-clutch automatic, and while performance times haven’t been revealed, you can expect it to be very quick indeed.

For reference, the regular Corvette (with the performance exhaust fitted) will make 370kW/640Nm, and scream from zero to 100km/h in a claimed 2.9 seconds.

International reports also point to the Z06 wearing wider bodywork, sportier Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2R tyres, the option of lightweight carbon-fibre wheels and more aero kit than a Boeing factory.

But… it also won’t be cheap. The regular Corvette range opens at $144,990 before on-road costs, then climbs to $160,500. The Z06, then, will be well north of that.

The Z06 is expected to debut internationally toward the end of this year, which means – should it make it to Australia – it’ll be 2022 at the absolute earliest.

But if the reports are to be believed, it will also be worth the wait.


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